articles

  • Thu, 23 Mar 2017 09:01:12 GMT

    In order to help pension schemes achieve their goals, we believed asset classes could offer three things that could help fund deficits; 1. growth e.g. equities and private equities; 2. risk control e.g. Liability Driven Investment (LDI); 3. cashflow matching e.g. Investment Grade Credit (IGC) We felt there were asset classes that offered all three benefits. Captured in our table of investment ideas, we sorted these asset classes in order of ‘easiness’: To what extent were they offering growth to fund the deficit? To what extent were they hedging and r ...

  • Wed, 22 Mar 2017 13:15:18 GMT

      I’ll admit, when I was first approached about the concept of taking on a “returner”, I can remember harbouring doubts. I was concerned about the practicalities of taking on experienced hires (albeit often experienced in different fields) into an intense, technical and hectic environment on a temporary basis. Would they be able to contribute? What if they weren’t able to work the same hours as everyone else? Would they learn quickly enough? For me there was a specific challenge - the ability of the “returners” to participate evenly i ...

  • Tue, 21 Mar 2017 09:35:15 GMT

        Prior to Kelly joining Redington, I had some misgivings about a “Returner” joining the Investment Consulting team, despite being very supportive of the "return to work" program and having been involved in the Returner recruitment process. The Investment Consulting team is client-facing, requires specific technical knowledge across a wide range of finance topics, and has a very lumpy workload in line with the quarterly meeting cycle.   To me, this presented a challenge. Namely finding enough interesting and useful things for our R ...

  • Fri, 17 Mar 2017 11:32:58 GMT

    Mum, wife, fitness fan, finance professional, and now Returner. Spent most of my career in Investment Management, in product development and project management, before deciding to have some time out. During that break travelled the world as a family for 6 months experiencing the New England Fall, beaches of Hawaii and life on the road in New Zealand and Australia. My two young girls’ independent personalities are reflected in their fancy dress choice - Spiderman vs. Elsa. I have always believed I could be, or achieve, anything; my job now is that they go out into the wor ...

  • Thu, 16 Mar 2017 10:12:41 GMT

    After more than ten years in private wealth management at Citibank and J.P. Morgan Chase in New York, I gave up my career when my husband’s job took us, along with our two-year old son, to Hong Kong. After the arrival of a second son in Hong Kong, I returned to the workforce in consulting, starting the day Lehman folded. Several years later, with the arrival of a third son and another global relocation on the horizon, I resigned yet again, this time to move our family to London. Not easily deterred from having a career, I joined the Credit Suisse returnship program in Lo ...

  • Wed, 15 Mar 2017 12:49:35 GMT

    I started my career 1989 at Citicorp running a long/short Japanese equity derivative hedge fund before moving to the Japanese equity team at JP Morgan in 1996. In search of a better work life balance I moved to Mercer in 1998 and became the head of Manager Research for Europe in 2000. I really enjoyed the work and the people, but in 2003 when my daughter was born I decided to take a career break. Although I continued to monitor the markets I didn’t end up going back to work, until now. When the opportunity of the returnship at Redington arose, it provided a great chance ...

  • Mon, 13 Mar 2017 17:47:48 GMT

    I began my career in 1998 in investment banking. Since then, I have worked in financial services in San Francisco, Boston and London in roles ranging from investment management to disputes and investigations consulting. I have three boys, ages 1, 3 & 5 years old. After having my first child, I returned to work for a year until having my second child. Instead of returning to work after my second maternity leave, my family and I relocated abroad due to my husband’s overseas posting. Upon returning to the UK and after having my third child, I decided to return to w ...

  • Thu, 23 Feb 2017 14:20:43 GMT

    What were the key takeaways from the Green Paper? Well, that probably depends which summary you read. While the headlines focused on the shock of potential changes, many in the industry actually saw this as a balanced and sensible account of the industry. Let’s step back for a second - in a race to get column inches it’s easy to feed mainstream press with stats and headlines that would suggest the government has opened the floodgates for destroying the value of Defined Benefit pensions and allowing companies to change the promises made. The pensions industry could ( ...

  • Mon, 26 Sep 2016 14:07:02 GMT

    This is an article I wrote in 2003. Thirteen years later, the debate is still raging! Original article can be found here. There can be little doubt that the defined benefit pension scheme business is going through a bad time, with UK and Irish pension schemes still underperforming. To address this problem, going forward, pension schemes and their sponsors should establish a platform to understand, monitor and control their short-term exposure to both the assets and the liabilities Did they see it coming? - For the most part, no. While both pension schemes and insurance companies ...

  • Fri, 23 Sep 2016 16:34:18 GMT

    28 June 2005 – Market Diary Avid readers of this column will know that ten days ago, with the real yield at a June ‘05 high of 1.56%, we drew a trend line and tentatively predicted that those levels wouldn’t last. It’s not that the market believes the 2% 2035 index linked gilt is fundamentally too cheap at 120.03; this asset’s price is driven by supply and demand. The five storey early 1800s Victorian home in Belgravia costs £15m, not because the price of bricks has gone up in Central London, but because the buyers have decided Eaton Squa ...